Companies, Stars and You can’t have it all

Posted on August 24, 2010. Filed under: Astronomy, Companies, Customers, Investors | Tags: , , , , , , |

CEOs, entrepreneurs & boards all struggle with how to satisfy 1) shareholders, 2) staff and 3) customers.

It’s hard to do that really well. Indeed most companies, with some lifespan, probably make a reasonable first of keeping two, of those three, stakeholders happy. Now I reckon striking a balance and keeping all three stakeholders happy, and importantly maintaining that balance, is nigh impossible.

I could bore you with a long post trying to prove this via examples.

Rather I’m going to can explain it conceptually, as a three-sided hill, looking like this from above.

 

Supernova remnant

 

Companies that gravitate to satisfying investors/shareholders and users/customers tend to expand (very fast in the case of VC fuelled growth), get well-known, achieve success for a (relatively) short while then, so often, fade from view: Let’s call them supernovae. Think MySpace or Boo.com, one of 10 failures you never heard of or forgot about. OK, the analogy is imperfect (supernovae are the death knell of stars) but you get the drift.

What about those companies that keep investors and founders happy but ignore customers? Well they end up building something customers don’t even want. Typically these companies develop a solution then go looking for a problem. There may be lots of energy, noise, activity and engineering going on in that company but nothing much comes out of it. A bit like a black hole really!

 

A star near us

 

Companies that look after their staff and customers well are more like stars: They often have a much longer life (like companies with a sustainable business) and have a more gradual start and end, when they burn out.

Indeed some stars turn into black holes and others get wiped about by supernovae.


You know it’s hard to keep a ball on top of a hill.

 

What do you think? Got some good examples? Perhaps you disagree with my broad thesis and can cite an example that disproves it.

Any comments are welcome. I don’t expect you, or anybody, to do so on this first substantive post, but go on surprise me.

Images sources: NASA and painting of Cerberus by William Blake


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    About

    I help entrepreneurs and small high growth potential companies in Sussex, Surrey, London & sometimes further afield. Flexible to your needs but typically help in raising investment finance and mentoring. Previously I was co-founder, CTO then CEO of a software company which we sold to a NASDAQ listed company

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